Aston - Church Building

Aston Church Building

All Saints Aston is a beautiful early medieval church building, the oldest building in Aston, click here to learn it's history. People love our building because of its sense of peace – the stones are soaked with the prayers that have been said here for a thousand years.  The Victorian stained glass window behind the altar tells the story of Christ’s resurrection on Easter morning. All the other windows in the church are plain glass, and that means that the building is pleasantly light all the year through.

It stands in a peaceful churchyard, and adjoining the church is our narthex room which we use for children’s activities, for coffee morning after the church service and for other social gatherings.
The Narthex church room is also available for hire.

The church building is small – it seats a maximum of 120 people.  Its small size creates a sense of warmth and intimacy, which is one of the things people enjoy about the church. We have a fine 2 manual Eminent digital organ.

Every week, we celebrate Holy Communion at the altar – this stone altar is said to pre-date the Norman Conquest!

Our font dates from the fourteenth century and is in use several times a month as we welcome children and adults into the family of the church through baptism.

The paschal candle is lit on Easter Eve as a sign of the resurrection of Jesus, and the new life and hope that brings.  The Paschal candle stand was a gift from the xxx family from the United States.

On the wall is a plaque commemorating William Mason, Rector of Aston from 1754 to 1797. Besides being Rector of Aston and Precentor of York Minster, Mason was a noted poet, playwright, musician and garden designer, who preached against slavery – a leading cultural figure of his day whose faith fed his creativity and his political convictions.

Our building reminds us of the richness of Christian tradition in Aston – a living tradition which continues to evolve.

History of Aston Church

There is a rich History at All Saints, to find out more about the building, its contents and the people involved from the past click here.